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Everest Base Camp. Kilimanjaro. Appalachian Trail. Tour du Mont Blanc. What is the best trek in the world? That’s the million-dollar question we set out to answer with the launch of our first ever Top 100 Treks poll, where we asked you to decide what are the very best trekking routes on the planet. Now, literally thousands of votes later, we have got closer to answering that question, and below you can find out the treks that you judged to be the best.

What is 'best'?
How can you say what is ‘the best’ trek, we hear you say. Well, of course this all depends on any number of factors, but what we are looking for are treks that give all the essential ingredients of a great adventure experience, such as the wild and rough terrain, the wildlife and fauna, the culture and friendliness of the local people and of course the spectacular mountain scenery!  And then of course everything also depends on your own personal experiences on a trek – was the weather okay, did you get ill, did you strike up great friendships with the crew and teammembers, and so on. So what is ‘the best’ is purely a personal point of view, though there are certain regions and countries that are more likely to give you that sense of awe and amazement just by dint of their spectacular natural beauty. 

Whatever else the Top 100 Treks poll has proved, is that there’s literally a whole world of amazing walking experiences out there, and in all parts of the planet near and far, there’s no excuse for not getting out and enjoying it. If nothing else, this serves as the ultimate ticklist for trekkers and walkers everywhere, and a subject for endless banter down the pub. Enjoy!


100. Lycian Way
Taking you around the coast of Lycia in Turkey, the Lycian Way is a long-distance footpath that is approximately 540km in length. The waymarked trail is Turkey’s first long-distance hiking trail and was built in order to identify and protect some of Turkey’s old roads.

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99. Bibbulmun Track
The Bibbulmun Track is a long distance walking trail in Western Australia which is about 1,000km long which runs from Kalamunda in the Perth Hills, to Albany on the south coast. The marked trail consists of 58 sections.

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98. Chilkoot Trail
The Chilkoot Trail is a 53 km trail that leads from Dyea, Alaska, in the United States, to Bennett, British Columbia, in Canada and takes along the same route as the old prospectors during the gold rush. You will pass through coastal rainforest, high alpine areas, and boreal forest.

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97. Durmitor National Park
Durmitor is a 39,000 acre national park in Montenegro, formed by glaciers and streams that have carved away the limestone rock. There are 48 peaks that reach 2,000m, Bobotov Kuk the highest at 2,523m, and 17 glacier Lakes within the park.

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96. Ausangate Circuit
A mountain with great significance in Incan mythology, Apu Ausangate is part of the Cordillera Vilcanota range in the Peruvian Andes. The ‘Camino Del Apu Ausangate’ has become a renowned trek for its remoteness, its views of the great sacred mountain combined with interactions with the local Quechua peoples.

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95. Blue Mountains Grand Traverse
The Blue Mountains Grand Traverse takes hikers through the Blue Mountains National Park in Australia. The trek typically takes 5-7 days of remote bushwalking, through rainforests and past numerous cascading waterfalls. The park is home to many native plants and animals, including rare and threatened species.

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94 Cape Wrath Trail
The 200 mile long Cape Wrath Trail begins at Fort William and takes hikers through the Scottish Highlands and along the west coast of Scotland to Cape Wrath, Britain’s northwestern most point. Described by some as ‘Britain’s toughest trail’, the route is unmarked and has no official line.

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